A look inside the budding battle between cyborg supply startups A look inside the budding battle between cyborg supply startups

A look inside the budding battle between cyborg supply startups Featured

Babitz and others want to make biohacking more mainstream.

Liviu Babitz’s eyes well up when he mentions his young son. In a past life Babitz was forced to be stoic, in perpetual danger as he worked for a secretive human-rights group in corrupt countries. Today he’s a cyborg, standing in front of crowds to champion the cause of biohacking.

As CEO of startup Cyborg Nest, Babitz is among a new breed of hackers-cum-entrepreneurs hoping to capitalize on putting technology into the human body. Their industry, biohacking, began as a hobby for a small group of tinkerers who implanted magnets into the flesh of their fingers and rice-sized radio-frequency identification (RFID) chips in their hands. It’s since grown to an only slightly larger community of enthusiasts who share experiments on forums and strive to push the body’s boundaries.

Babitz and others want to make biohacking more mainstream. They think artificial senses and implanted devices will be commonplace in society’s foreseeable future, and they’re jostling to get in on the ground floor of a billion-dollar industry before tech giants take over.

“This will be as profitable as any other tech industry out there,” Babitz told Digital Trends. “This is the future. Everybody is going to be a cyborg.”

Read the article on digitaltrends.com

Leave a comment

Make sure you enter all the required information, indicated by an asterisk (*). HTML code is not allowed.

back to top

Subscribe to the Business Brief Newsletter

Get our complimentary briefing, featuring news & analysis of the business trends and practices.
Terms and Conditions